Background

The African continent is often described as the World’s poorest and least developed region; a phenomenon which some attribute to (amongst several other factors) the pervasive effects of colonialism and the inhumane slave trade experienced in the region in the decades and centuries past.  

The psychological impact of colonialism and especially the slave trade seems to have endured through to the Post-colonial African era; seeing the rate of continued dependence on the “developed countries” or “western world”, the almost “DNA ingrained” perception of the black African as inferior to the Caucasian and people of other races or colours, as well as the passive (and sometimes unpatriotic) roles played by indigenous Africans in the pursuit of our own economic and political advancement. These have resulted in slow movements in development, as significant progress is erroneously perceived to be contingent on aids, grants and initiatives from the developed nations, rather than self-initiated actions from African citizens and states.

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It is also noteworthy that the educational system and curriculum of most African nations largely has no reference to, or any bearing on the African situation. This has led to the persistent churning out of young people loaded with mostly obsolete, irrelevant and unusable information in their heads, little wonder the low Gross Domestic Product (GDP) of most African Nations resulting from an extremely low Gross Mental Output (GMO) which stems from a very low Gross Mental Attitude (GMA).

However, it is an established fact that a significant progression in the African socio-economic and socio-political sphere is a possibility, and more so when indigenous Africans rise to take up responsibilities for the growth and development of Africa.